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“I have been positively reported on and followed by the media, so you can know me, trust me and research me before any decisions are made.” Dr F. Musa

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Video Intro

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I am a Consultant Ophthalmologist practising at the Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS Trust, St James’ University Hospital in Leeds and the Spire Hospital in Elland.

Ophthalmology has been a passion of mine for over a decade. I feel privileged to work in a branch of medicine that has constantly innovated and evolved and now has an array of successful life-changing treatment options.

My training has been extensive and I have actively sought training in the most advanced, successful and safest forms of surgery. I am one of a handful of surgeons who is fellowship trained in treating both corneal disorders and glaucoma. This allows me to adopt a uniquely comprehensive approach to complex reconstructive surgery of the front of the eye.

BBC

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DMEK for Fuchs Dystrophy on the BBC, Dr Fayyaz Musa

Video Topic : DMEK is the latest form of transplant for patients with Fuchs dystrophy. Vision after surgery has been shown to be better than the current standard procedure, DSEK. This is the first procedure of it kind carried out in the North of England and is accessible to patients on the NHS and privately.

Fuchs’ Dystrophy. Fuchs’ dystrophy is a slowly progressing disease that usually affects both eyes and is slightly more common in women than in men. Although doctors can often see early signs of Fuchs’ dystrophy in people in their 30s and 40s, the disease rarely affects vision until people reach their 50s and 60s.

Fuchs’ dystrophy occurs when endothelial cells gradually deteriorate without any apparent reason. As more endothelial cells are lost over the years, the endothelium becomes less efficient at pumping water out of the stroma. This causes the cornea to swell and distort vision. Eventually, the epithelium also takes on water, resulting in pain and severe visual impairment.Epithelial swelling damages vision by changing the cornea’s normal curvature, and causing a sight-impairing haze to appear in the tissue. Epithelial swelling will also produce tiny blisters on the corneal surface. When these blisters burst, they are extremely painful.

At first, a person with Fuchs’ dystrophy will awaken with blurred vision that will gradually clear during the day. This occurs because the cornea is normally thicker in the morning; it retains fluids during sleep that evaporate in the tear film while we are awake. As the disease worsens, this swelling will remain constant and reduce vision throughout the day.

When treating the disease, doctors will try first to reduce the swelling with drops, ointments, or soft contact lenses. They also may instruct a person to use a hair dryer, held at arm’s length or directed across the face, to dry out the epithelial blisters. This can be done two or three times a day.

When the disease interferes with daily activities, a person may need to consider having a corneal transplant to restore sight. The short-term success rate of corneal transplantation is quite good for people with Fuchs’ dystrophy. However, some studies suggest that the long-term survival of the new cornea can be a problem.

Text by National Eye Institute (NEI)/NIH

BBC

Yorkshire Post

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New technique restores pensioner’s eyesight


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Ruth Walker-Mahmood (right) and her mum, Shirley Walker

PIONEERING eye surgery carried out by a Yorkshire specialist has restored the sight of a 78-year-old woman who is back behind the wheel of her car.

Pensioner Shirley Walker was unable to drive or read due to a genetic eye condition called Fuchs’ Dystrophy but now enjoys driving again after a procedure replaced damaged cells in both corneas.

It was carried out on the NHS by Fayyaz Musa, a consultant ophthalmologist at Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS Foundation Trust, who is among a small number of surgeons internationally using the technique, called Descemets Membrane Endothelial Keratoplasty, or DMEK.

This is a treatment for sufferers of Fuchs’ Dystrophy and means that only the damaged layer of cells in the cornea is replaced instead of patients undergoing a full corneal graft, a procedure which carries considerable discomfort.

Mrs Walker, who lives in Roberttown, West Yorkshire, says her eyesight has never been better.

Her condition, which is not uncommon, had been painful and she was losing her independence.

“Swelling had been building up which was causing the vision loss and the disease was taking a hold quickly, necessitating a corneal graft,” said Mrs Walker. “My sister had undergone the full version in the past and I knew only too well that the rehabilitation period was a long one and it was a big intervention.

“With the procedure which Mr Musa offers, within just 10 days my vision was better than it had ever been in my life and I could read letters on the chart that I had never been able to see before.

“It wasn’t long until I was back behind the wheel of my car and also using my computer for doing online banking and internet shopping.

“We are so lucky to have Mr Musa here in Yorkshire as he is one of only a select number of surgeons in the world to carry out this state of the art surgery. He inspires every confidence and is truly amazing – he has literally given me my life back.”

Her daughter, Ruth Walker-Mahmood, 57, who has the same condition and may need surgery, said the procedure had “transformed” her mother’s life.

“Immediately, she could see so much more. Her eyesight is better than it has ever been, even when she was at school.”

Mr Musa, who lives in Huddersfield, said the condition caused the inner layer of cells in the cornea to quickly degenerate.

“This layer, called the endothelium, is responsible for maintaining the proper amount of fluid in the cornea and keeps it clear for good vision by pumping out excess fluid that could cause corneal swelling. The disease usually affects both eyes and causes a gradual decline in vision due to corneal oedema (swelling) and clouding. As the disorder progresses, swelling of the cornea can cause blisters on the front of the cornea known as epithelial bullae.”

The new procedure, he said, involved a partial-thickness corneal graft in which only the innermost layers are replaced.

“DMEK replaces only the Descemet’s membrane and endothelium, and leaves the patient’s cornea much closer to its original condition than other transplant techniques. This offers improved optical quality, fast and often complete visual rehabilitation.”

Huddersfield Examiner

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New technique restores pensioner’s eyesight


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Huddersfield eye surgeon Dr Fayyaz Musa

Eye surgeon Dr Fayyaz Musa has done it again – bringing the gift of sight back to a Kirklees patient.

The Huddersfield and Halifax doctor has performed a world class eye procedure on Gomersal pensioner Shirley Walker.

The Examiner reported last year how the Bradley surgeon had become one of the first in the UK to undertake the revolutionary new technique.

The innovation – called descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty (DMEK) – saw him transplant a single layer of cells the width of one tenth of a human hair onto the eye of Farnley Tyas resident Joan Greenwood at Calderdale Royal Hospital.

Now he has repeated his magic technique to help Shirley, 78, who was losing her sight due to corneal swelling.

Shirley went to see Dr Musa after her daughter Ruth Walker-Mahmood, 57, was diagnosed with a genetic eye disease called Fuchs Dystrophy.

Ruth’s condition didn’t need any further treatment but in order to save her sight, Shirley did.

She has now had surgery on both eyes.


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Mother and daughter, Shirley Walker and Ruth Walker-Mahmood, who have both been treated by eye surgeon Dr Musa

Shirley said: “I was in a great deal of discomfort, was losing my vision and because I live alone and wasn’t able to drive, I was also rapidly losing my independence.

“Swelling had been building up, which was causing the vision loss and the disease was taking a hold quickly necessitating a corneal graft.

“My sister had undergone the full version in the past and I knew only too well that the rehabilitation period was a long one and it was a big intervention.

“With the procedure which Dr Musa offers, within just 10 days my vision was better than it had ever been in my life.

“I could read letters on the chart that I had never been able to see before!

“It wasn’t long until I was back behind the wheel of my car and also using my computer for online banking and internet shopping.

“We are so lucky to have Dr Musa here in Yorkshire as he is one of only a select number of surgeons in the world to carry out this state of the heart surgery.

“He inspires every confidence and is truly amazing, he has literally given me my life back.

“He takes a holistic approach to his work in that he was interested in the genetic aspect of this condition. He treats us as a family!”


Consultant ophthalmologist Fayyaz Musa with consultant ophthalmologist Ruby Lagnado and staff

A Huddersfield eye surgery patient has become one of the first in the UK to benefit from a revolutionary technique.

Farnley Tyas resident Joan Greenwood has become the first person in the north to benefit from a new method of cornea transplant at Calderdale Royal Hospital.

Joan went under the knife of consultant opthalmologist Fayyaz Musa, who is thought to be one of only two UK eye surgeons and just 12 worldwide, currently practising a pioneering method.

The innovative technique, called descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty (DMEK), sees a single layer of cells the width of one tenth of a human hair transplanted onto the eye.

It means faster recovery times and better eyesight than the traditional method, which involves a bigger graft.

Mr Musa, who hails from Bradley, spent four months at the Netherlands Institute of Innovative Ocular Surgery learning the delicate transplant technique.

He said: “It was a mixture of excitement and nervousness doing it on my own for the first time.

“It takes a while – it’s a very fiddly procedure. There’s a lot of steps that you need to get spot on for it to work.

“I’ve been practising on patients in Holland but I had a team of technicians to support me there.

“Over here I had to do it all by myself.”

Joan said she was really pleased with her operation and the speed at which she was able to get home.

The 76-year-old, who has always been active and was once a junior high jump champion, was keen to get back to walking.

“Every day my sight is improving,” she said. “I was amazed at how quickly I recovered and how quickly I was able to go home.

“I love walking and I have been able to get out and do some walking since I had the operation.”

Mr Musa said he was now hoping the surgery would become more popular as it offered quicker healing time, better quality vision and reduced the risk of graft rejection, which is present in any transplant, to less than 1%.”

He added: “The department I work in is full of great surgeons and it’s great to be able to add to that with this new technique.

“It uses basic instruments, there’s no fancy lasers so it’s better and the equipment is cheaper!”

Spenborough Guardian

Asian Express

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A Clearer Vision


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Huddersfield eye surgeon Dr Fayyaz Musa

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